Follow this link to skip to the main content NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology JPL HOME EARTH SOLAR SYSTEM STARS & GALAXIES SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BRING THE UNIVERSE TO YOU JPL Email News RSS Mobile Video
JPL Banner
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
Home Participate
MULTIMEDIA

Images

<< First Page     < Previous  |   4   |  5   |  6   |  7   |  8   |  9   |  10   |  11   |  12   |  13   |  14   |  15   |  16   |  17   |  18   |  Next >     Last Page >>
Okubo_figure_6.jpg
Deformation Bands in Martian Bedrock
Full Resolution
20080807_PR.jpg
Clay Minerals in Mawrth Vallis Region of Mars
Full Resolution
Crater Floor Deposits in Promethei Terra
Crater Floor Deposits in Promethei Terra
Full Resolution
This map shows the thickness of the north polar layered deposits on Mars as measured by the Shallow Radar instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
How Thick is the North Polar Ice Cap on Mars?
Full Resolution
Eridania Basin Light-Toned Outcrops
Eridania Basin Light-Toned Outcrops
Full Resolution
Sample Noachis Terra
Sample Noachis Terra
Full Resolution
Phobos in Stereo
'Marsshine' on Shadowed Part of Phobos
Full Resolution
PIA10370-with-inset.jpg
'Marsshine' on Shadowed Part of Phobos
Full Resolution
'Marsshine' on Shadowed Part of Phobos
Phobos from 5,800 Kilometers
Full Resolution
PIA10369.jpg
NASA Spacecraft Images Mars Moon in Color and in 3D
Full Resolution
PIA10368-cropV2.jpg
Phobos from 6,800 Kilometers (Color)
Full Resolution
PIA10368.jpg
NASA Spacecraft Images Mars Moon in Color and in 3D
Full Resolution
Phobos from 5,800 Kilometers
Phobos from 6,800 Kilometers
Full Resolution
Phobos from 6,800 Kilometers
Phobos from 5,800 Kilometers (Color)
Full Resolution
Caught in Action: This image shows avalanches on North Polar Scarps.
Caught in Action: Avalanches on North Polar Scarps
Full Resolution
Chloride Salt Deposit in Southern Highlands of Mars
Bright Exposures of Chloride Salt on Southern Mars
Full Resolution
Bright Exposures of Chloride Salt on Southern Mars
Bright Exposures of Chloride Salt on Southern Mars
Full Resolution
PSP_006477_1745.jpg
Dust-Devil Tracks in Southern Schiaparelli Basin
Full Resolution
This observation shows a wrinkle ridge in Solis Planum, located in the Thaumasia region of Mars, a high-elevation volcanic plain located south of the Valles Marineris canyon system and east of the Tharsis volcanic complex. Solis Planum contains some of the most distinct and well studied arrays of wrinkle ridges on Mars.

Wrinkle ridges are long, winding topographic highs and are often characterized by a broad arch topped with a crenulated ridge. These features have been identified on many other planetary bodies such as the Moon, Mercury, and Venus. On Mars, they are many tens to hundreds of kilometers long, tens of kilometers wide, and have a relief of a few hundred meters. Wrinkle ridges are most commonly believed to form from horizontal compression or shortening of the crust due to faulting and are often located in volcanic plains. They commonly have asymmetrical cross sectional profiles and an offset in elevation on either side of the ridge. Large dunes are also visible bordering the wrinkle ridge.

The reddish colors seen in this image most likely indicate the presence of dust (or indurated dust) and the darker, bluish colors most likely indicate the presence of larger rocks and boulders on the wrinkle ridge.
Wrinkle Ridge in Solis Planum
Full Resolution
PSP_002622-002675_0945_RGB_zoom2.jpg
Global View of Candor Chasm Study Location
Full Resolution
20071019_CRISM-Images.jpg
Spectrometer on NASA Orbiter Maps Minerals at Possible Landing Sites
Full Resolution
Color Image of Nili Fossae Trough, a Candidate MSL Landing Site
Color Image of Layers in Holden Crater, a Candidate MSL Landing Site
Full Resolution
20070920_PSP_003583_1425.jpg
Lava-Draped Channel System on Mars
Full Resolution
The formation of the large outflow channels on Mars have been attributed to catastrophic discharges of ground water. Many of the channels start in areas where the ground has apparently collapsed: the surface is now well below the surrounding undisturbed ground. Within the collapsed region, blocks of undisturbed material can often be seen and this has led to such regions being called chaotic terrain.

In Aureum Chaos, the OMEGA experiment on Mars Express indicated the presence of phyllosilicates (clay minerals) which have been detected in a variety of bright outcrops and scarps. The subimage shows such an outcrop in a chaotic terrain region. At the highest resolution, layering can be seen. The image will be used to assess at what stage in Mars's history these clays minerals were formed and how.

The area referred to as Aureum Chaos is located at 334 degrees East, 4 degrees South on the West side of the Margaritifer Terra region of Mars.
Light-Toned Outcrop in Aureum Chaos
Full Resolution
This HiRISE image (PSP_003597_1765), shows fractured mounds on the southern edge of Elysium Planitia.

The mounds are typically a few kilometers in diameter and about 200 feet tall. The fractures that crisscross their surfaces are dilational (extensional) in nature, suggesting that the mounds formed by localized uplift (i.e., they were pushed up from below).

The mounds are probably composed of solidified lava. They are contiguous with, and texturally similar to, the flood lavas that blanket much of Elysium Planitia, and, where dilation cracks provide cross-sectional exposure, the uplifted material is rocky.

Patches of mechanically weak and disrupted material overlie the rocky mound material. This is particularly conspicuous in the northeast corner of the HiRISE image. These patches may be remnants of a layer that was once more continuous but has been extensively eroded. Smooth lava plains fill the low-lying areas between the mounds. They are riddled with sinuous pressure ridges. The entire area is covered by a relatively thin layer of dust and sand.
Fractured Mounds in Elysium Planitia
Full Resolution
<< First Page     < Previous  |   4   |  5   |  6   |  7   |  8   |  9   |  10   |  11   |  12   |  13   |  14   |  15   |  16   |  17   |  18   |  Next >     Last Page >>

USA.gov
PRIVACY     FAQ     SITEMAP     FEEDBACK     IMAGE POLICY