Follow this link to skip to the main content National Aeronautics and Space Administration Logo
NASA Banner
NASA Mars Exploration Program
Mars Exploration Program
Home
MULTIMEDIA

Images

<< First Page     < Previous  |   35   |  36   |  37   |  38   |  39   |  40   |  41   |  42   |  43   |  44   |  45   |  46   |  47   |  48   |  49   |  Next >     Last Page >>
Spirit examined spectacular layered rocks exposed at "Home Plate."
Spirit Says Goodbye to 'Home Plate'
Full Resolution
Lengthy detective work with data NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit collected in late 2005 has confirmed that an outcrop called "Comanche" contains a mineral indicating that a past environment was wet and non-acidic, possibly favorable to life.
Carbonate-Containing Martian Rocks
Full Resolution
Spirit acquired this mosaic while investigating the area east of the elevated plateau known as "Home Plate" in the "Columbia Hills." The trench exposed a patch of nearly pure silica, with the composition of opal. It could have come from either a hot-spring environment or an environment called a fumarole, in which acidic, volcanic steam rises through cracks. Either way, its formation involved water, and on Earth, both of these types of settings teem with microbial life.
Rover's Wheel Churns Up Bright Martian Soil
Full Resolution
This 360-degree view from a site dubbed "Engineering Flats" shows the rover's shadow.
Spirit's View from 'Engineering Flats'
Full Resolution
This full-circle scene combines 817 images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on Opportunity.
'Greeley Panorama' from Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter
Full Resolution
On May 19th, 2005, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars.
A Moment Frozen in Time
Full Resolution
An artist's concept portrays a NASA Mars Exploration Rover on the surface of Mars. Two rovers were launched in 2003 and arrived at sites on Mars in January 2004. Each rover was built to have the mobility and toolkit for functioning as a robotic geologist.
Artist's Concept of Rover on Mars
Full Resolution
As of June 2012, the target landing area for Curiosity, the rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, is the ellipse marked on this image. The ellipse is about 12 miles long and 4 miles wide (20 kilometers by 7 kilometers).
Revised Landing Target for Mars Rover Curiosity
Full Resolution
As of June 2012, the target landing area for Curiosity, the rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, is the ellipse marked on this image, about 12 miles long and 4 miles wide (20 kilometers by 7 kilometers).
Landing Target for Mars Rover Curiosity, in Stereo
Full Resolution
As of June 2012, the target landing area for Curiosity, the rover inside NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, is the ellipse marked in black on this image.
Target for Start of Driving by Mars Rover Curiosity
Full Resolution
This image shows changes in the target landing area for Curiosity, the rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory project.
Revised Landing Target for Mars Rover Curiosity
Full Resolution
A June 2012 revision of the landing target area for Curiosity, the big rover of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, reduces the area's size.
Altered Landing Target in Gale Crater, Mars
Full Resolution
As of June 2012, the target landing area for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is the ellipse marked on this image of Gale Crater.
Altered Landing Target in Gale Crater, Mars
Full Resolution
As of June 2012, the target landing area for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission is the ellipse marked on this image of Gale Crater.
Destination Gale Crater in August 2012
Full Resolution
In this picture, the rover examines a rock on Mars with a set of tools at the end of the rover's arm, which extends about 7 feet (2 meters).
Curiosity: Robot Geologist and Chemist in One!
Full Resolution
NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity catches its own late-afternoon shadow in this dramatically lit view eastward across Endeavour Crater on Mars.
Late Afternoon Shadows at Endeavour Crater
Full Resolution
Michael Malin, left, principal investigator for three science cameras on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, comments to a news reporter during tests with Curiosity's mobility-test stand-in, Scarecrow, on Dumont Dunes in California's Mojave Desert.
Watching Test Drives in California for Rover Mission to Mars
Full Resolution
Mars Science Laboratory mission team members ran mobility tests on California sand dunes in early May 2012 in preparation for operating the Curiosity rover, currently en route to Mars, after its landing in Mars' Gale Crater.
Test Rover Aids Preparations in California for Curiosity Rover on Mars
Full Resolution
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove about 12 feet (3.67 meters) on May 8, 2012, after spending 19 weeks working in one place while solar power was too low for driving during the Martian winter.
Looking Back at Greeley Haven After Opportunity's First Drive of 2012
Full Resolution
Back-and-forth blinking of this two-image animation shows movement of ripples covering a sand dune on Mars.
Ripple Movement on Sand Dune in Nili Patera, Mars
Full Resolution
Back-and-forth blinking of this two-image animation shows movement of a sand dune on Mars. The images are part of a study published by Nature on May 9, 2012, reporting movement of Martian sand dunes at about the same flux (volume per time) as movement of dunes in Antarctica on Earth.
Advancing Dune in Nili Patera, Mars
Full Resolution
An in-flight camera check on NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft turned on illumination sources that are part of the Curiosity rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) instrument.
Camera Test on Curiosity During Flight to Mars
Full Resolution
A group of journalists take part in a field trip to learn about the clues hidden in the rock layers with Curiosity Project Scientist, John Grotzinger.
Mars Science Laboratory Journalist Field Trip
Full Resolution
The MAVEN high-gain antenna measures 6.5 feet (79 inches) in diameter by 3.3 feet (40 inches) tall. The reflector is made of Kevlar honeycomb core sandwiched between two composite face sheets. It is currently undergoing performance, pattern, and acoustic testing at Lockheed Martin's facility in Newtown, Pa.
MAVEN High-Gain Antenna
Full Resolution
This photo taken on March 3 shows the large hydrazine propellant tank prior to integration with the core structure of the MAVEN spacecraft at a Lockheed Martin clean room near Denver.
Propellant Tank for MAVEN Spacecraft
Full Resolution
<< First Page     < Previous  |   35   |  36   |  37   |  38   |  39   |  40   |  41   |  42   |  43   |  44   |  45   |  46   |  47   |  48   |  49   |  Next >     Last Page >>

USA.gov
PRIVACY     FAQ     SITEMAP     FEEDBACK     IMAGE POLICY