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MH4-TECP.jpg
Phoenix Mars Lander's Chemistry Lab in a Box
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MH3-WCL.jpg
Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander
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MH3-WCL.tif
Phoenix Mars Lander's Chemistry Lab in a Box
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MH2-Microscopes.jpg
Chemistry Lab for Phoenix Mars Lander
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MH2-Microscopes.tif
Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander
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MH1-MECA.tif
Chemistry Lab for Phoenix Mars Lander
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RA3-ellipses-unlabeled.tif
Possible Landing Ellipses for Phoenix
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RA3-ellipses-labeled.tif
Possible Landing Ellipses for Phoenix
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lg_140.jpg
Powered Landing of Phoenix
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lg_139.jpg
Phoenix Twilight
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RA4-CTX.tif
Context Image of Planned Landing Site
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RA2-MOLA.tif
Topographical Context of Phoenix Landing Region
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RA1-global.tif
Far-Northern Destination for Phoenix Mars Lander
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Phoenix_Lander2.jpg
Both Solar Arrays Open on Phoenix Mars Lander
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PHX_HiRISE_site_21.jpg
Terrain Type for Phoenix Landing
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aresoutflow.jpg
Odyssey Views A Surface Changed by Floods
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The floor of this unnamed crater in Aonia Terra has been filled with multiple layers of material.
Layered Fill
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The dune field in this polar region crater looks like a stubby arrow pointing the way west. This unnamed crater is located in Planum Chronium.
Unnamed crater is located in Planum Chronium.
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This HiRISE image (PSP_003597_1765), shows fractured mounds on the southern edge of Elysium Planitia.

The mounds are typically a few kilometers in diameter and about 200 feet tall. The fractures that crisscross their surfaces are dilational (extensional) in nature, suggesting that the mounds formed by localized uplift (i.e., they were pushed up from below).

The mounds are probably composed of solidified lava. They are contiguous with, and texturally similar to, the flood lavas that blanket much of Elysium Planitia, and, where dilation cracks provide cross-sectional exposure, the uplifted material is rocky.

Patches of mechanically weak and disrupted material overlie the rocky mound material. This is particularly conspicuous in the northeast corner of the HiRISE image. These patches may be remnants of a layer that was once more continuous but has been extensively eroded. Smooth lava plains fill the low-lying areas between the mounds. They are riddled with sinuous pressure ridges. The entire area is covered by a relatively thin layer of dust and sand.
Fractured Mounds in Elysium Planitia
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20070515_ld.jpg
Materials Move Downslope on Mars
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HiRISE image (PSP_001942_2310) shows a crater approximately 11 km (7 miles) in diameter, located in Acidalia Planitia, part of the Northern Plains. Several features in and around this crater are suggestive of fluids and ice at and near the surface. 

The south-looking (or equator facing) walls of this crater are cut by numerous gullies such as the ones shown in this image's cutout (500 x 600 m or 550 x 650 yards), with well developed alcoves, sinuous channels, and terminal fan deposits. These gullies seem to originate at the same height, suggesting that the carving agent may have emanated from one single layer exposed in the crater's wall. 

Contrastingly, no gullies are observed in the north-looking (or pole facing) wall of this crater. Terrestrial gullies very similar to the ones shown in this image are produced by surface water. The arrows in the cutout show fissures that may indicate detachment of surficial materials possibly held together by subsurface ice, sliding en masse down the crater's wall. 

The muted topography of the crater and its surroundings, the relatively shallow floor (300 m or 330 yards), the convex slope of its walls-all are consistent with ice being present under the surface, mixed with rocks and soil. Ice would have acted as a lubricant, facilitating the flow of rocks and soils and hence smoothing landscape's features such as ridges and craters' rims.

The concentric and radial fissures in the crater's floor may indicate decrease of volume due to loss of underground ice. Piles of rocks aligned along these fissures and arranged forming polygons are similar to features observed in terrestrial periglacial regions such as Antarctica. Antarctica's features are produced by repeated expansion and contraction of subsurface soil and ice, due to seasonal temperature oscillations. The funnel-shaped depressions visible in the crater's floor could be collapse pits, further evidence of ice decay; alternatively, they could be smoothed-out impact craters.
Signs of Fluids and Ice in Acidalia Planitia
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Phoenix-Lander-on-Mars-3D-300dpi.jpg
Phoenix Lander on Mars (Stereo)
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Phoenix-Lander-on-Mars-hi-res-300-dpi.jpg
Phoenix Lander on Mars
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Depth-to-Ice Map of a Southern Mars Site Near Melea Planum
Depth-to-Ice Map of a Southern Mars Site Near Melea Planum
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Depth-to-Ice Map of an Arctic Site on Mars
Depth-to-Ice Map of an Arctic Site on Mars
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