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MRO_Fairing.jpg
Fairing Preparing for Farewell
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Opportunity's wheels dug more than 10 centimeters (4 inches) deep into the soft, sandy material of a wind-shaped ripple in Mars' Meridiani Planum region during the rover's 446th martian day, or sol (April 26, 2005).
Looking Back at 'Purgatory Dune'
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20050615-01.jpg
Bringing the Blast: Upper Stage Rocket Arrives at Kennedy Space Center
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This image is an artist's concept of a view looking down on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The spacecraft is pictured using its Shallow Subsurface Radar instrument (SHARAD) to "look" under the surface of Mars.
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Radar, Top View (Artist's Concept)
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MRO-SHARAD-top-view.jpg
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter using its SHARAD radar (top view)
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MRO-SHARAD-side-view.jpg
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter using the SHARAD radar (side view)
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MRO-MOI.jpg
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter during its Mars Orbit Insertion
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MRO-Mars-Climate-Sounder.jpg
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter using its Mars Climate Sounder instrument
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Hamilton_G21258_cover.jpg
Olivine-Rich Bedrock Around Nili Fossae
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This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark slope streaks coming down the slopes of a knob in western Amazonis Planitia. All of the surfaces in this image are mantled by dust. On the slopes, mass movement of dry dust has created the streaks.
Slope-Streaked Knob
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This false color image shows a region with craters of different ages located at the margin of Acidalia Planitia. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.
Cratered Acidalia Planitia
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A portion of an exposure of bedrock dubbed "Larry's Outcrop" shows little layering in this view, in contrast to nearby outcrops called "Methuselah" and "Jibsheet."
Larry's Outcrop' in False Color
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20050518-01.jpg
Getting Closer to Countdown: Spacecraft Undergoes Readiness Tests
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This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast "Tharsis Bulge" on Mars.
Cross-Cutting Faults
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MRO_arrives_KSC.jpg
Next Vital Step: Spacecraft Delivery
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This is a zoomed in view on Spirit 's "Lookout" panorama on the drive up to the summit "Husband Hills."
Close-Up of 'Lookout' Panorama
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This is the Spirit panoramic camera's "Lookout" panorama, acquired on the rover's 410th to 413th martian days, or sols (Feb. 27 to Mar. 2, 2005).
Lookout Panorama' from Spirit
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av003_1.jpg
One Step Closer to Launch: Rocket Delivery
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Gazing across the landscape of the "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater on Mars, scientists saw hints of tilted rock layers across the area traversed by the Spirit rover.
Contemplating Rock Layers
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av_002_006.jpg
An Atlas 5 Rocket
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av001_launch_007.jpg
An Atlas 5 Rocket
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av002_1.jpg
An Atlas 5 Rocket
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MRO_hirise.jpg
HiRISE Comparison
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This image shows rocky debris and dust, which planetary scientists call "regolith" or "soil," that has been churned up by the rover wheels.
Churned-Up Rocky Debris and Dust
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Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take the images combined into this mosaic view of the rover.
Opportunity Self-Portrait
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