Follow this link to skip to the main content National Aeronautics and Space Administration Logo
NASA Banner
NASA Mars Exploration Program
Mars Exploration Program
Home
MULTIMEDIA

Images

<< First Page     < Previous  |   63   |  64   |  65   |  66   |  67   |  68   |  69   |  70   |  71   |  72   |  73   |  74   |  75   |  76   |  77   |  78   |  Next >     Last Page >>
br_PIA00945.jpg
MGS Views of Labyrinthus Noctis
Full Resolution
br_PIA00941.jpg
MGS Views of Labyrinthus Noctis
Full Resolution
br_PIA00942.jpg
MGS Views of Nirgal Vallis
Full Resolution
br_PIA00944.jpg
Rotated Perspective View of Nirgal Vallis
Full Resolution
br_PIA00943.jpg
Subsection of Nirgal Vallis Image
Full Resolution
br_PIA03481.jpg
Acheron Fossae in Visible Light
Full Resolution
This THEMIS visible image shows a close-up view of the ridged plains in Hesperia Planum. This region is the classic locality for martian surfaces that formed in the "middle ages" of martian history. The absolute age of these surfaces is not well known. However, using the abundance of impact craters, it is possible to determine that the Hesperian plains are younger than the ancient cratered terrains that dominate the southern hemisphere, and are older than low-lying plains of the northern hemisphere. In this image it is possible to see that this surface has a large number of 1-3 km diameter craters, indicating that this region is indeed very old and has subjected to a long period of bombardment. A large (80 km diameter) crater occurs just to the north (above) this image. The material that was thrown out onto the surface when the crater was formed ("crater ejecta") can be seen at the top of the THEMIS image. This ejecta material has been heavily eroded and modified since its formation, but there are hints of lobate flow features within the ejecta. Lobate ejecta deposits are thought to indicate that ice was present beneath the surface when the crater was formed, leading to these unusual lobate features. Many of the Hesperian plains are characterized by ridged surfaces. These ridges can be easily seen in the MOLA context image, and several can be seen cutting across the lower portion of the THEMIS image. These "wrinkle" ridges are thought to be the result of compression (squeezing) of the lavas that form these plains.
Hesperia Planum
Full Resolution
Depth-of-ice.jpg
Cross-section of Icy Soil
Full Resolution
polars_ext.jpg
Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons
Full Resolution
cover_therms.jpg
Global Map of Thermal Neutrons
Full Resolution
cover_epi.jpg
Global map of epithermal neutrons
Full Resolution
This lunar-like scene occurs along the southeastern rim of the Isidis Planitia basin. The Isidis basin is an ancient impact crater some 1200 km across that is found along the boundary separating the heavily-cratered southern highland terrain of Mars from the northern lowlands. Elements of both terrains are evident in this image as an island of rugged highland terrain surrounded by smoother lowland terrain. The resurfacing of the Isidis basin produced a system of wrinkle ridges, some of which are seen on the lowland terrain in the image. Wrinkle ridges are a common feature on the surface of the moon and add to the lunar-like quality of this image. Layers are visible in the large island, the most resistant of which likely are from lava flows that created the highland terrain. The process by which the global-scale highland/lowland dichotomy was created remains a mystery.
Isidis Rim
Full Resolution
br_E01-01773sub_i1.gif
Erosion of North Polar Layers and Genesis of nearby Sand Dunes
Full Resolution
br_E02-02651Nirgal_i1.gif
Nirgal Vallis and its Windblown Dunes
Full Resolution
Thaumasia valley networks.
Thaumasia Valley Networks
Full Resolution
This image is near the southern edge of a low, broad volcanic feature called Syrtis Major. A close look at this image reveals a wrinkly texture that indicates a very rough surface that is associated with the lava flows that cover this region. On a larger scale, there are numerous bright streaks that trail topographic features such as craters. These bright streaks are in the wind shadows of the craters where dust that settles onto the surface is not as easily scoured away. It is important to note that these streaks are only bright in a relative sense to the surrounding image. Syrtis Major is one of the darkest regions on Mars and it is as dark as fresh basalt flows or dunes are on Earth.
Syrtis Major
Full Resolution
oly-az.jpg
Why is Olympus Mons so big?
Full Resolution
3dom.gif
Why is Olympus Mons so big?
Full Resolution
br_1999_labeled.jpg
Martian South Polar Pits in Layer of Frozen Carbon Dioxide
Full Resolution
br_PIA03178.jpg
MOC's 100,000th Image
Full Resolution
br_PIA03459.gif
First THEMIS Image of Mars
Full Resolution
br_PIA03461.gif
First THEMIS Infrared and Visible Images of Mars
Full Resolution
br_PIA03459.gif
First THEMIS Image of Mars
Full Resolution
br_PIA02398.jpg
Melas Chasma
Full Resolution
br_PIA00403.jpg
West Candor Chasma
Full Resolution
<< First Page     < Previous  |   63   |  64   |  65   |  66   |  67   |  68   |  69   |  70   |  71   |  72   |  73   |  74   |  75   |  76   |  77   |  78   |  Next >     Last Page >>

USA.gov
PRIVACY     FAQ     SITEMAP     FEEDBACK     IMAGE POLICY