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Half Dome Rock - Left Eye
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Close-up of Moe - Left Eye
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Utopian Plain
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Improved MPF 360-degree Color Panorama
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The 'Face on Mars'
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Sojourner Rover View of Pathfinder Lander
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Coprates Chasma
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Frost at the Viking Lander 2 Site
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First Color Image From Viking Lander 1
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Martian Dune Field
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First Photograph Taken On Mars Surface
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Olympica Fossae
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Sand Dunes of Nili Patera, Syrtis Major
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South Polar Cap
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Martian "Swiss Cheese"
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Frost-covered dunes
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Martian North Polar Cap
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Martian Crater
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"Happy Face" Crater
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Newton Crater
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Planum Australe--the Plains of the South. Patchy frost lingers late into Martian spring in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle view from November 25, 1999. Spring would give way to summer in only 1 month, on December 25, 1999. The surfaces underneath the frost have different properties--some get warmer while others stay cold--thus causing frost to linger on colder surfaces and sublime away from warmer surfaces, leaving the dazzling, almost psychedelic pattern seen at the center of this image. Circular features in this view are old craters formed by meteor impact. The brightest patches within most of these circles are fields of sand dunes covered by frost.
Spring Thaw in Northwestern Planum Australe
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Elysium Mons is one of three large volcanoes that occur on the Elysium Rise-- the others are Hecates Tholus (northeast of Elysium Mons) and Albor Tholus (southeast of Elysium Mons). The volcano rises about 12.5 kilometers (7.8 miles) above the surrounding plain, or about 16 kilometers (9.9 miles) above the martian datum-- the "zero" elevation defined by average martian atmospheric pressure and the planet's radius.
Elysium Mons Volcano - Detail of Southern Caldera Wall and Floor
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This is a Mars Orbiter Camera view of the cratered uplands located between the Amenthes Fossae and Hesperia Planum. This ancient, cratered surface sports a covering of windblown dunes and ripples oriented in somewhat different directions. The dunes are bigger and their crests generally run east-west across the image. The ripples are smaller and their crests run in a more north-south direction. The pattern they create together makes some of the dunes almost appear as if they are giant millipedes! This picture covers an area only 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) wide. Illumination is from the top.
Ripples on Cratered Terrain North of Hesperia Planum
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High-resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) have revealed small cone-shaped structures on lava flows in southern Elysium Planitia, Marte Valles, and northwestern Amazonis Planitia in the northern hemisphere of the red planet. The most likely interpretation of these cones is that they may be volcanic features known as "pseudo craters" or "rootless cones." They share several key characteristics with pseudo craters on Earth: they are distributed in small clusters independent of structural patterns, are superimposed on fresh lava flows, and they do not appear to have erupted lavas themselves
Possible Rootless Cones or Pseudo craters on Mars
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