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06.24.2011

New Animation Depicts Next Mars Rover in Action

This artist concept features NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover,
Mars Rover Curiosity in Artist's Concept, Close-up
This artist concept features NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover,

Although NASA's Mars Science Laboratory will not leave Earth until late this year nor land on Mars until August 2012, anyone can watch those dramatic events now in a new animation of the mission.

The full, 11-minute animation, at http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=97780842 , shows sequences such as the spacecraft separating from its launch vehicle near Earth and the mission's rover, Curiosity, zapping rocks with a laser and examining samples of powdered rock on Mars.  A shorter, narrated version is also available, at http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=97718982 .

Curiosity's landing will use a different method than any previous Mars landing, with the rover suspended on tethers from a rocket-backpack "sky crane." 

The new animation combines detailed views of the spacecraft with scenes of real places on Mars, based on stereo images taken by earlier missions.

"It is a treat for the 2,000 or more people who have worked on the Mars Science Laboratory during the past eight years to watch these action scenes of the hardware the project has developed and assembled," said Mars Science Laboratory Project Manager Pete Theisinger at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.  "The animation also provides an exciting view of this mission for any fan of adventure and exploration."

JPL manages the Mars Science Laboratory project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The rover and other parts of the spacecraft have been delivered to NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch during the period of Nov. 25 to Dec. 18, 2011. In August 2012, Curiosity will land on Mars for a two-year mission to examine whether conditions in the landing area have been favorable for microbial life and for preserving evidence about whether life has existed there. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

For more information about the Mars Science Laboratory, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .

2011-195

Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov


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